Henry Winkler Interview….

I had the great pleasure of interviewing Henry Winkle recently for Parents.com. Although I was a little bit star struck, his warm, casual demeanor quickly put me at ease, and we had a wide-ranging, funny, thoughtful conversation.

Henry Winkler and elephant

Most people know Henry Winkler for his iconic role as the Fonz inHappy Days or for his many other acting gigs since. What most people don’t know is that Winkler barely graduated high school, and that although he was great at memorizing scripts, reading them was a challenge. He’s struggled with dyslexia his entire life, only getting a diagnosis at age 30. Now, he travels around the world talking to kids about his early years and raising dyslexia awareness.

To that end, Winkler has written a wonderful series of children’s books about a dyslexic boy named Hank Zipzer. Hank’s smart, funny, and resourceful; but, like Winkler as a child, school and reading are a huge challenges for him.

The books are printed in a special font that makes it easier for dyslexic kids to read them, and although they concern the adventures of a dyslexic child, they will appeal to any early-middle grade reader. The newest book, You Can’t Drink a Meatball with a Straw comes out March 8, 2016. I highly recommend reading it with your kids— it’s laugh-out-loud funny, extremely clever, and you’ll find yourself cheering for Hank throughout the story. I caught up with Winkler recently to talk about his books, parenting, his recent trip to Asia, and more:

Meatball through a Straw

How did you get started writing books and what is your writing process like?

I never saw myself writing books—I carried the mantle of being stupid for so long— but an agent suggested it to me, and then I met my wonderful co-writer Lin Oliver, and the rest was history. We work only in person, so every morning since 2003, I’ve gone to Lin’s office for a few hours. I sit in the same rocking chair I’ve been sitting in for the last 13 years, and we do the outline of the book. We are intertwined in every rhythm, word, and story. I talk and she types, then she reads it back to me, and we argue over every word. We ask questions like, “What does Hank do well?” and then we’re always surprised by where the story takes us.

We just started working on a short story for the magazine Boys’ Life—which I find incredible because I got my first copy of that magazine years ago when I was a Cub Scout. I couldn’t read it at the time, and now here I am writing for them!

What was school like for you as a child?

I remember it all—the shame, the fear, the anxiety, the embarrassment. My brain is like a Magic 8 Ball, sometimes it’s all gobbledygook. Sometimes there’s no answer there, and sometimes I get it right. When I’m writing the Hank Zipzer books, I relive those moments like I’m 8 years old. I’ve not forgotten how painful it was to have done things like memorized all my spelling words for a test and then get to school, and not be able to remember any of them.

Is reading easier now?

It really depends on the kind of book. I’m great with thrillers (Daniel Silva is a favorite), and the style of writing can make the work of reading easier. I don’t have any favorite children’s books because I didn’t read as a kid. In fact, when we were reading The Tale of Two Cities in school, I poured water over the pages, so it looked like I was really diving into it.

Would having a dyslexia diagnosis have helped you as a child?

Absolutely, yes. My life was like a stainless steel cylinder with no footholds, no handholds. I tried like a frog to crawl up the wall towards the sun, and kept sliding back down.

Read the full interview here: http://www.parents.com/health/special-needs-now/meet-the-celeb-behind-these-books-for-kids-with-dyslexia/